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Skulker

 
 

skulker:

(plural: ‘skulkers‘)

‘to skulk’ (verb) = to hide, to keep out of sight with the idea of causing trouble to others or as a coward; move without being notice; move from place to place secretly; to avoid work or responsibilities;  and ‘skulk’ (noun) = (less commonly) a person who avoids work or responsibility; a group of foxes and a group of thieves; for the pronunciation of ‘skulk’, please click here
a skulker, feigning sickness to skip work

a skulker, feigning sickness to skip work

a person who avoids/escapes work, duty or responsibility by pretending to be ill or helpless or incapable of doing;

a person who is easily scared or who can easily be made to obey by threatening;

a malingerer; a shirker;

a slacker,

a skulker, hiding in wait to harm somebody

a skulker, hiding in wait to harm somebody

e.g.

Teddy is a skulker, always comes with one excuse or the other to skip school.

Every political party has skulkers who just lie in wait for something damaging happens to the party so that they can exploit the situation and get to the top rank.

When the workers union was infested with skulkers who just quivered at the threats of dismissal from jobs by the management, some intrepid workers chose to stand up for themselves and fought with management boldly.

For a political blogpost that shows us how we come across this word in our daily browsing, please click here, for an article in which we see this word popping up (fourth line; second para) referring to a person hiding in wait to do some harm to others, please click here and for an article that shows us how this word, along with ‘shirker’, (ninth line; second para) is used to refer to soldiers who refuse to fight, please click here.
Note: ‘Skulker’ is also found in the computer terminology, referring to apps or tools. For an article that shows us how this word is found in this context, please click here.
 
 

Signor

Signor:

(also with the spelling: ‘signior’ & ‘signore‘; short form: ‘Sig.’ or ‘S.’; female: ‘signora’; plural: ‘signors‘ or ‘signori‘; pronunciation: letter ‘g’ is silent; pronunciation: letter ‘g’ is silent)

Signor, the Italian president

Signor Giorgio Napolitano, the Italian president

an Italian gentleman;

used as a title, equivalent to ‘Mr.’ in English, for a man of some social status from Italy, a country in Europe,

a typical siginor in the past

a typical signior in the past

e.g.

When you see a signor from Italy you wish him a ‘Buongiorno’ in Italian which means ‘Hello; good morning’ in English!

The word ‘signior’ which is the same as ‘signor’ is often found in the old Italian literature and in plays by authors like Shakespeare.

When signors and signore meet, they pass courtesies that might sound very strange to the non-Italian speaking listeners.

For a sports article that shows us how this word is found as a title, with the English title ‘Mr’, before an important person from Italy, please click here, for an article in which we see this word before the name of Mussolini, please click here and for an advertisement about an Italian restaurant which has the ‘Signor’ in it that shows us how we come across this word in our daily browsing, please click here.
Note: ‘Signor’, always with a capital ‘S’, is often found in people’s names and in the names of businesses related to Italy, e.g. Barry Signor, Jackie Signor, Melissa Signor, etc.

Senor

señor:

(a Spanish word used in English; also written: ‘senor’ without the accent/diacritic mark (~) on letter ‘n’; plural: ‘señors‘ or ‘señores‘;  for the right pronunciation of this word, please click here)

Note: ‘Spanish’ the mother tongue of Spain is the most spoken language in Mexico and also in other Spanish influenced countries.
a senor with his senora and their criatura (child)

a senor with his senora and their criatura (child)

 

a Spanish-speaking person; a person from Spain; a Spaniard;

a title of respect when used before a man’s name, usually in its short form ‘Sr.’ (like the English ‘Mr.’ meaning Mister),

e.g.

When I checked in at a hotel in Spain, the receptionist said: Welcome, señor!

For a news article that shows us how we come across this word in our daily browsing, please click here and for a local news article in which we see this word with a spelling mistake, please click here.

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señora:

(a Spanish word used in English; also written; ‘senora’, without the accent on the letter ‘n’; plural: ‘senoras‘; for the right pronunciation of this word, please click here)

a Spanish-speaking married woman;

a title of respect when used before a woman’s name, usually in its short form ‘Sra.’ (like the English ‘Mrs.’ meaning Mistress),

e.g.

When Sarah and her female team were at the business conference in Mexico City, Mexico, the attendant at the conference hall wanted to know if the señoras needed any refreshments before the conference began.

For a news article that shows us how we come across this word in our daily browsing, please click here and for a business news article in which we see this word being used, please click here.

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señorita:

a gaggle of senoritas

a gaggle of senoritas

(a Spanish word used in English; also written ‘senorita’, without the accent on the letter ‘n’; plural: ‘senoritas‘; for the right pronunciation of this word, please click here)

a Spanish-speaking unmarried woman;

a title of respect when used before an unmarried woman’s name, usually in short form ‘Srta.’ (like the English Miss)

e.g.

My granddaughters were thrilled to be called señoritas  when they were at a bullfight show in Madrid on their vacation in Spain.

For an advertisement in which see this word being used as the name of a restaurant, please click here and for an interesting blog post in which we are given the difference between a señorita and a señora, please click here.

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Scamp

 
 

scamp:

(plural: ‘scamps‘; for the right pronunciation of this word, please click here)

a dishonest person; a cheat; a scallywag (previous entry);

a trouble-making but, usually, playful young person; a mischief-maker,

scamps in  a scuffle

scamps in a scuffle

e.g.

Timmy is a notorious scam in our neighbourhood with ‘mischief’ painted all over his cheeky face.

On the eve of a festival you’ll see scamps roaming the streets, blaring their car horns, throwing empty beer cans at people until early hours.

It’s interesting to note that even aged, famous and well-educated people are called ‘scamps’ out of affection and those ‘scamps’ enjoy being called so!

For a political article that shows us how we come across this word in our daily browsing, please click here, for a political article in which we see politicans being called ‘scamps and dorks’, please click here and for a news article in which a much-loved famous person being called a scamp affectionately, please click here. (For an article that shows us how this word is used for animals and even in names of some pets, please click here.)
Note: ‘Scamp’, always with a capital ‘S’, is rarely found in the names of people, e.g. Clevansy Scamp, Dave Scamp, George Scamp, etc. For an article that explains the origin of this word as a surname/family name/last name, please click here.

 
 

Renter

renter:

(plural: ‘renters‘)

(rent, money paid for renting something)

(rent, money paid for renting something)

‘rent’, in this context, = the money or anything equivalent in value that is to be paid for using somebody’s property temporarily; ‘to rent’, in this context, = to use somebody’s property temporarily by paying some amount or anything equivalent in value (note: ‘rent’, in a different context, can be a rip or an opening made in a sock or cloth, e.g. “She accidentally made a big rent in her stocking while she was walking in the garden.” and it can also be the past form of the verb word ‘to rend’ which mean ‘to rip or to tear’ a hole or a split something, etc. “After we had left the camp site to visit the lake, a wild bear rent/rended our tent flap, entered the tent and made away with some canned fish and meat!”)

a person who uses (rents) somebody else’s property by paying some money or anything equivalent in value; a tenant;

(less commonly) a person who lets out (lets other people) use his property in return for some payment; a landlord (owner);

(rare usage) a person in the film industry who rents films for commercial showing in theatres/cinemas; a film distributor,

renters --- tenant (L) taking the keys to a house, landlord (R) giving the keys

renters — tenant (L) taking the keys to a house, landlord (R) giving the keys

e.g.

Being a renter (tenant), Josephine must know not only her rights but also her responsibilities in renting the building.

Renters (landlords/owners) of the resort cabins in the mountains fleece their tenants with very high rents during summer season, claiming that they have business only three months a year and the rest of the year they have to live off the money they make in the season!

Fear grips the international film renters and film rentals because of the Youtube and other online movie distribution and rental outlets, people do not have to go to theatres or cinemas as often as they did before.

For an article that advises renters (tenants) on the intricacies of foreclosure that shows us how we come across this word in our daily browsing, please click here, for an article in which we see ‘renters’ being used to refer to people who rent movies/films (not distributors) to watch, please click here and for a local news item that shows us how we find this word in our daily news, please click here.
Note: ‘Renter’, always with a capital ‘R’, is often found in the names of people, e.g. Bill Renter, Clara Renter, Jamie Renter, etc. For an article that explains the origin of this word as the surname/last name/family name, please click here.

Renegade

renegade:

(plural: renegades‘; for the right pronunciation of this word, please click here)

a person who rejects his religion, group or cause for another religion, group or cause;

a deserter;

an outlaw; a rebel,

a renegade leaving his group

a renegade leaving his group

e.g.

Jimmy is called a renegade because he stopped attending his religious order prayers and, as the rumour has it, he is planning to join another order for better benefits.

Most young men join rebel groups for a cause and some gun action, but once they understand the real intentions and bad practices of the leaders, they become renegades and even become police informers.

There are cops (police officers) who are called renegades because they break the law instead of enforcing it for several personal and professional reasons.

For a news article about a police officer becoming a renegade, please click here, for the review of a book about American renegades, please click here and for a political article that shows us how we come across this word in our daily browsing, please click here.

Regular

 
 

regular:

(plural: ‘regulars‘; pronunciation: the letter ‘g’ rhymes with the letter ‘g’ in “legume” — for the right pronunciation of this word, please click here)

Note: ‘Regular’ is more commonly used as an adjective to mean that something or someone is ‘ordinary, common, having the qualities that are normal, something that is done frequently, e.g. ‘regular guy/regular man’, ‘regular exercise’, ‘regular language’, ‘regular job’, ‘regular visitors’, ‘diet soda and regular soda’, etc.
some park regulars relaxing

some park regulars relaxing

a person who visits a place or seen at a place, such as a pub, club, park, etc., regularly (often — daily, weekly or monthly or twice a day or thrice a week or once a month, etc. but usually keeping to the same time or frequency);

a person of normal behaviour, looks and taste (not special or not extraordinary or not show-off or crazy);

a soldier who is a member of an army kept by a country all the time (not on temporary or contract basis);

a member of a religious order,

some pub regulars having drinks

some pub regulars having drinks

e.g.

Mr Smith is a regular at the pub… comes in the evening, usually at 6:00, has a few beers or drinks, stays for a couple of hours, meets with the other regulars and leaves at 8:00.

After being friends with several heroic and chauvinistic men and realising how fickle-minded they are all, Mary has decided to get married to a regular (a regular guy) and live peacefully.

Every business — a shop, mall, coffee shop, restaurant, theatre, etc. — depend on regulars who stay with it through thick and thin with their patronage!

For a blog post about a rapper being a regular on a TV show that shows us how we come across this word, in this sense, in our daily browsing, please click here, for a sports article about a player being a regular to his team, please click here and for a news article that shows us how this word pops up in our daily news, please click here.